thinkmoney Online Account Management:


thinkmoney Online Account Management:

News Article

Find out how the driving licences change on 8th June will affect you

Published 5 June 2015 by

You mightn’t be aware but on the 8th June 2015 the DVLA are scrapping the driving licence paper counterpart. We wanted to help you understand what this will mean for you and to drive home how important it is to renew your license every 10 years to avoid a potential fine of £1000.

Customers with existing paper counterparts

From the 8th June 2015 the paper counterpart of your licence will no longer be legal and the DVLA will no longer issue new ones. They are advising that people should destroy their paper part from the 8th but keep hold of their photocard, as this will still be valid.

The paper part of a driving license was brought in originally so that extra details that wouldn’t fit on the photocard could be displayed – things like what vehicle categories you can drive and whether you had any penalty points. From the 8th June this information will be stored electronically instead.

You’ll be able to check what information is held on your record online, by phone on 0300 083 0013 or by post. If you need to share your record with an employer, car hire company or insurer at any point, you’ll need to apply for a licence check code.

Customers with paper driving licences

If you’ve never had a photocard driving license because you received your licence before they were introduced in 1998, your paper only licence will still be valid. However, if you have changed your name or address since you received your licence, you must apply for a new licence and will receive a photocard replacement.

£1000 fine warning

Did you know that photocard licenses must be renewed every 10 years, or every three years if you’re over 70? The dates may change if you’ve a restricted license if you’ve a medical condition, so make sure you check.

The DVLA believes that by March 2016, up to two million people in the UK will have failed to renew their photocards and if you don’t renew, you’re potentially risking a fine of £1,000 if you’re stopped by the police.

It’s not too expensive to renew - it costs £14 to do it online or £17 if you renew by post. If your address or name has changed then it’s also important to let the DVLA know and get a new updated photocard – or again you could risk being stung if the police stop you. If you need to renew or make changes don’t delay, sort out your licence today!