Cleaning out your house? You could make £1,850 if you have these items

Faye

Money Saving Tips

It’s estimated that almost half (49.2%) of the UK’s workforce is currently working from home, with a further 8.4 million placed on furlough, meaning they are spending more time in the house than they are probably used to.

With this in mind, it’s no surprise that between February and April this year Google searches for ‘tips to declutter’ have increased by 14 % (when compared to the same period last year), confirming that Brits are using this extra time to clear out their homes. But, did you know that you could be storing hidden treasures?

thinkmoney has uncovered some of the most popular home, technology and sports items that, over time, have been gathering more value than you may think. In fact, owning and selling all of these items could make you more than £1,850 on eBay.

What’s more, thinkmoney has only analysed the sold price as opposed to the listed - confirming that these are realistic prices for the following items.

You could earn £622 by selling these vintage tech items

Selling these items could earn you more than a third of the UK’s monthly wage, so it might be time to clear out your home to see if these products are gathering dust.

Rare Apple Macintosh computers can net you £330

It’s no surprise vintage Apple tech can make you a tidy profit. But, did you know that if you have a rare Apple III computer from 1980 - or parts from the early ‘80s - you could make £330 from selling it on eBay?

There is a huge market for vintage Apple tech, with even classic Apple Macintosh cassette tapes selling for £20 each. So, if you have a bundle of old Apple products lying around, you could find yourself with a nice little earner.

Have a Nokia 3310 lying around? Sell it for £30

The Nokia 3310 was an icon of the noughties. 20 years later, they are still popular and have become something of a collector’s item, with people selling them for up to £30 each.

The same can also be said for the 1st generation iPhone, as they typically go for a whopping £150. If you have a couple of them stashed away, you could make a small fortune from your old phones.

Make up to £600 with these records, turntables and even VHS tapes

Vintage turntables are the most valuable homeware item - selling for more than three times the price of a new record player

If you have a vintage turntable tucked away in your home, you could earn £219 by selling the item three times the price of buying a brand-new record player. In fact, the turntables are so valuable that, even if its days of playing records are long over, you could still earn the same money by selling the item for parts.

Additionally, vinyl records sell for an average of £10-£15 - depending on how rare they are.

Vintage walkmans and radios are some of the most valuable music items

If you used to listen to your music via walkman and buried them away in bags at the back of your wardrobe when the iPod was released, you are in luck. Walkmans and vintage radios are now valuable commodities, selling for up to £70 each - particularly branded items, such as Roberts radios.

Jaws VHS tapes are some of the best-selling videos

VHS tapes are surprisingly popular in our digital era. The Jaws films could net you the biggest profits, with VHS tapes of the films selling for up to £15. But, if you do have the likes of classic Disney films on VHS, you could expect to make £10 per video. So, it might be worth clearing out your favourite childhood items.

But, it’s not just tech that could make you a handsome profit.

Selling these homeware items could see you earn over £300

Brits could be sitting on a small fortune if they have these homeware items tucked away in the wardrobe or loft.

Retro Singer sewing machines sell for £137

If you have a vintage sewing machine, but there’s no chance you’ll get any use out of it, you could earn up to £137 by selling it - particularly if it is a Singer product.

Brand-new Singer sewing machines range between £100-£140, suggesting the vintage items are even more valuable.

Using vintage Pepsi and Cola boxes as storage? You could earn up to £70 per box

Perhaps you kept the boxes as a nod to your childhood? Or, they’ve been collecting dust as storage in your wardrobe? Either way, if you are looking to make some money during the current climate, you could earn up to £70 per box by selling on eBay.

Likewise, if you are feeling nostalgic towards your childhood and have kept retro cereal boxes - such as ‘80s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles boxes - they sell for an average of £10 to £15.

Are you a footy fan with vintage England shirts in storage? Make £320 from selling them

If you’ve got a stash of football shirts hidden away, now is the time to dust them off to sell.

Football boots from 2004 can sell for up to £100 - four times more than brand-new boots

If you used to play football in 2004 and purchased a pair of the Nike Total 90 III FG football boots, you can rest easy knowing that you made the right decision. Give them a bit of a clean-up and you can make up to £100 from selling them on eBay. That’s four times more than the average cost of Nike boots today.

And, it’s not just football boots that are extremely popular among football fans.

England’s ‘93/’94 shirt is one of the most valuable football tops on eBay

England’s class of ‘93 featured the likes of Teddy Sheringham, Ian Wright and Alan Shearer, but it’s the home shirt that has stood the test of time. The iconic red shirt is worth a staggering £70 today - £5 more expensive than buying a brand-new England 2019 home shirt.

Likewise, if you purchased the rare ‘92/’93 season yellow goalkeeper shirt, it was a worthy investment. Today, you can expect an average of almost £60 if you were to sell it - £15 more than the current 2019 goalkeeper shirt.

Retro baseball tickets can fetch £50

If you were a fan of baseball and even went to the games in the ‘60s - particularly ‘63/’64 - then you can thank your past self. Retro baseball tickets can command up to £50 when sold today.

Season ticket stubs are also a huge commodity, with 35 stubs from the 1967 era selling for a staggering £100. So, it might just be worth rifling through that clutter to find some of the items mentioned in this list.

Most expensive items ever sold on eBay

While you can make a very handsome profit from selling the above tech, home and sports products, have you ever considered just how much people will pay for items on eBay?

  • Gigayacht - £138 million ($168,000,000)
  • Lunch with Warren Buffet - £2 million ($2.6 million)
  • Honus Wagner baseball card - £901,000 ($1.1 million)
  • Mars rock - £369,000 ($450,000)

The most expensive item to have ever been purchased on eBay is, in fact, a yacht - sold for £138 million ($168 million), with the deposit alone reaching £70 million ($85 million). The yacht went to Russian billionaire and owner of Chelsea F.C, Roman Abromovich.

In the past, winning bids have also been placed on lunch with Warren Buffet - CEO of Berkshire Hathaway and one of the world’s most successful businessmen - for an eye-watering £2 million ($2.6 million).

But, if you happen to come across any Mars rocks gathering dust in your loft, you could expect to earn up to £369,000 ($450,000) if you place them on eBay.

Lee Chambers, an Environmental Psychologist and Wellbeing Consultant, said: “Many people report decluttering to be mindful. If you are feeling overwhelmed, you can set small goals to tackle certain areas, which will release dopamine and give you a mood boost. Although, I advise everyone should keep at least a few things that have such a value they would be happy to pass them on.”

If you are looking for even more tips to make money, check out our savings hacks for how to save up to £496 while working from home. Alternatively, read more information on how to stay on top of your finances with our Budgeting Hub.

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